How Much Protein Do Your Body Need?

A lot of guys are confused about how much protein your body need.

Many athletes and exercisers are increasing their protein intake to help them both lose weight and build more muscle, but is that the right way to go?

It makes sense that, since muscles are made of protein, eating more dietary protein will help you build more muscle. However, science tells us that isn’t always the case.

How to Calculate Your Protein Needs:

1. Weight in pounds divided by 2.2 = weight in kg
2. Weight in kg x 0.8-1.8 gm/kg = protein gm.

Use a lower number if you are in good health and are sedentary (i.e., 0.8). Use a higher number (between 1 and 1.8) if you are under stress, are pregnant, are recovering from an illness, or if you are involved in consistent and intense weight or endurance training.

Example: 154 lb male who is a regular exerciser and lifts weights
154 lbs/2.2 = 70kg
70kg x 1.5 = 105 gm protein/day

Calculating Protein as a Percentage of Total Calories

Another way to calculate how much protein you need is by using daily calorie intake and the percentage of calories that will come from protein. To do this, you’ll need to know how many calories your body needs each day.

First, find out what your Basal Metabolic Rate is by using a BMR calculator.

Next, figure out how many calories you burn through daily activity and add that number to your BMR. This gives you an estimate of how many calories you need to maintain your current weight.

After you’ve figured out your maintenance calories, next figure out what percentage of your diet will come from protein. The percentage you choose will be based on your goals, fitness level, age, body type and metabolic rate. Most experts recommend that your protein intake be somewhere between 15 and 30%. When you’ve determined your desired percentage of protein, multiply that percentage by the total number of calories for the day.

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The Truth About Losing Weight

The mental side of weight loss is the most important aspect of losing weight. Your mind is what drives all of your decisions and your choices and, if it isn’t in the right place, your choices won’t be either. With that in mind, what are the mental strategies you need to finally lose weight? They may not be what you think.

1. Honesty. It’s amazing how easy it is to lie to ourselves. We lie about eating too much: “Oh, it’s just a few handful of M&Ms…there can’t be that many extra calories, right?” We lie about exercising: “I promise, I’ll workout tomorrow. I know I said that yesterday, but I really mean it this time!” Some people take it even further, avoiding looking at themselves in the mirror, stepping on a scale or acknowledging when they have to buy bigger clothes.

Even keeping a food journal doesn’t always keep us honest. I had one client who, if she ate the way she reported in her diary, wouldn’t have the energy to pick up a glass of water, much less a dumbbell. It turns out that a dinner of wheat crackers, fruit and some string cheese was also supplemented by three beers (“I didn’t really count those as food,”), nachos (“I only had a few!”) and some cookies (“They were on my kid’s plate, so I didn’t count them.”).

Being honest isn’t just about knowing what you eat and how much exercise you’re getting. It also means being honest about whether you’re really ready to make a lifestyle change.

2. Forgiveness. Here’s something most people won’t tell you about losing weight: You will fail sometimes. That doesn’t mean you’ll never lose weight or that you possess a weakness of character that other people don’t have. It means that you’re just like the rest of us – sometimes you’ll make healthy choices and sometimes you won’t.

3. Trust. When you first start a weight loss program, it’s hard to trust yourself. How many times have you said you’ll do your workout only to skip it? How many times have you sworn you wouldn’t have that extra slice of pizza only to give into temptation? Learning how to trust yourself may be one of the hardest parts of losing weight. If you know you’ll sometimes fail, how can you trust yourself?

Trust is not about being perfect or guaranteeing that you’ll always do the right thing. It’s about knowing you’ll stumble, but that you can handle it without giving up. Ask yourself how many times you’ve tried to lose weight. You may feel like you’ve failed at it, but the fact that you keep trying is a sure sign you haven’t given up.

4. Persistence. Here’s something else people don’t always tell you about weight loss: You will probably doubt yourself at some point. It may be because you’re not getting results, or not getting them as quickly as you’d like. It may be because you feel sore, overworked or just overwhelmed by all the decisions you have to make. Whatever the reason, you may start to wonder: Am I doing this right? Is it worth it?

Taking Exercise leads to a Healthy Lifestyle

You may know a lot about living a healthy lifestyle, but do you know what does that mean?

Well,In general, a healthy person doesn’t smoke, is at a healthy weight, eats healthy and exercises. Sounds simple, doesn’t it?

The trick to healthy living is making small changes…taking more steps, adding fruit to your cereal, having an extra glass of water…these are just a few ways you can start living healthy without drastic changes.

We know it’s good for us but avoid it like the plague either because we’re used to being sedentary or afraid that exercise has to be vigorous to be worth our time. The truth is, movement is movement and the more you do, the healthier you’ll be. Even moderate activities like chores, gardening and walking can make a difference.

Just adding a little movement to your life can:

  • Reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes
  • Improve joint stability
  • Increase and improve range of movement
  • Help maintain flexibility as you age
  • Maintain bone mass
  • Prevent osteoporosis and fractures
  • Improve mood and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression
  • Enhance self esteem
  • Improve memory in elderly people
  • Reduce stress

So, even if you opt for small changes and a more modest weight loss, you can see the benefits are still pretty good. One study has found that just a 10% weight reduction helped obese patients reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and increase longevity.

Eating Well May Contribute To Your Health

 

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Eating a healthy diet is another part of the healthy lifestyle. Not only can a clean diet help with weight management,

it can also improve your health and quality of life as you get older. You can use the new MyPlate to determine how

many calories you need and what food groups you should focus on or, if you’re looking for smaller changes, you can

use these tips for simple ways to change how you eat:

  • Eat more fruit. Add it to your cereal, your salads or even your dinners.
  • Sneak in more veggies. Add them wherever you can–a tomato on your sandwich, peppers on your pizza,or extra veggies in your pasta sauce. Keep pre-cut or canned/frozen veggies ready for quick snacks.
  • Switch your salad dressing. If you eat full-fat dressing, switch to something lighter and you’ll automatically eat less calories.
  • Eat low-fat or fat-free dairy. Switching to skim milk or fat free yogurt is another simple way to eat less calories without having to change too much in your diet.
  • Make some substitutes. Look through your cabinets or fridge and pick 3 foods you eat every day. Write down the nutritional content and, the next time you’re at the store, find lower-calorie substitutes for just those 3 items.

Creating a healthy lifestyle doesn’t have to mean drastic changes. In fact, drastic changes almost always lead to failure. Making small changes in how you live each day can lead to big rewards, so figure out what you can to be healthy today.